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Inner Cities Need Disaster Relief Too By Jesse Jackson

Inner Cities Need Disaster Relief Too By Jesse Jackson

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie recently spoke at a conference sponsored by the Clinton Global Initiative in Chicago on disaster recovery in the wake of Superstorm Sandy, which caused an estimated $39 billion in damage in New Jersey. Christie talked through the plans for rebuilding after the initial steps to get power and water back […]

In Defense of a Good Man By Dr. E. Faye Williams

In Defense of a Good Man By Dr. E. Faye Williams

I express my feelings directly. While maintaining civility, I have no difficulty expressing the truth as I see it. One such situation involves our current US Attorney General, Eric Holder, who, despite a long career in service to this country, has been targeted for professional destruction by conservative political elements. For those of short memory, […]

The Minimum Wage for the Least and Left Out

The Minimum Wage for the Least and Left Out

It seems that the term “poverty” has been sidelined from our national discourse, even though 15 percent of all Americans, and 26 percent of African Americans experience poverty. The Fair Labor Standards Act was signed on June 25, 1938, seventy-five years ago, so perhaps this is a good time to explore the roots of the […]

State of Equality and Justice in America: 50th Anniversary of Medgar Evers’ Assassination Reminds Us of Civil Rights Work That Remains

State of Equality and Justice in America: 50th Anniversary of Medgar Evers’ Assassination Reminds Us of Civil Rights Work That Remains

  Barbara Arnwine State of Equality and Justice in America: 50th Anniversary of Medgar Evers’ Assassination Reminds Us of Civil Rights Work That Remains Opportunity for Young Activists to Meet Unmet Needs By Barbara R. Arnwine Fighting for social and racial justice is the enduring component of the civil right movements. In the tumultuous 1960s […]

A Shameful Parade

A Shameful Parade

It’s hard for me to overlook the shameful parade of sons of celebrated leaders who are in jail or on the way to jail for confessed crimes ranging from bribery, embezzlement and just plain thievery. Their crimes go beyond mere law-breaking. The sons have dishonored a legacy of public service that their fathers helped to […]

Trial to Secure Justice for Trayvon Martin Begins

Trial to Secure Justice for Trayvon Martin Begins

“I believe that’s Trayvon Martin, that’s my baby’s voice. Every mother knows their child, and that’s his voice.” – Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin On Monday of last week, the trial of George Zimmerman, charged in the second-degree murder of Trayvon Martin, finally got underway. The surface facts of the case are not in […]

LBJ’s War On Poverty Still Only Partly Won

LBJ’s War On Poverty Still Only Partly Won

Fifty years ago this week, Medgar Evers, the NAACP regional secretary in Mississippi, was murdered by a member of the White Citizens’ Council. Evers’ death received national attention, serving only to strengthen the movement for civil rights. Two years later, President Lyndon Johnson delivered a historic commencement address at Howard University, laying out progress made […]

Government Surveillance: What Goes Around Comes Around

Government Surveillance: What Goes Around Comes Around

  When reading about the knashing of teeth about government surveillance by members of the press in the AP and James Rosen cases and of Americans in general by the National Security Agency my first reaction is, “What goes around comes around.” I don’t recall any overwrought weeping and wailing from the press or the […]

If You Don’t Like Disparities, Try Equality

If You Don’t Like Disparities, Try Equality

Last week I attended a “think tank” conversation with leaders of the Rodham Institute, a newly established center at George Washington University that is dedicated to reducing health disparities in Washington, DC. This is an important effort, because Washington, DC is such a divided city. “East of the River”, Wards 7 and 8, are the […]

Medgar Evers Would Be Proud

Medgar Evers Would Be Proud

  Fifty years after the NAACP field secretary was assassinated for his work to expand the vote, a new report reaffirms that his sacrifice was not in vain. For the first time in history, African Americans voted at a higher rate (66.2 percent) than non-Hispanic Whites (64.1 percent). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, black […]

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